Teacher finds that Legos are good for development in children, so she bans boys from playing with them in order to achieve gender equality

This teacher deserves a special place in hell.

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I’ve seen and heard a lot of shit in my day, but this takes the cake. I wouldn’t go as far as to say this is the most evil thing I’ve ever heard, but it definitely belongs in the top 3. A Kindergarten teacher from Berkeley found that playing with Lego is good for cognitive development in young children, so she decided to ban boys from playing with them in order to “close the gender gap”; because the best way to achieve equality is to hinder the development of one gender… Obviously.

Karen Keller, a kindergarten teacher at Captain Johnston Blakely Elementary has reportedly banned male students in her class from playing with Lego. She says the male students can have them “when hell freezes over.”

In Karen Keller’s kindergarten classroom, boys can’t play with Legos.
They can have their pick of Tinkertoys and marble tracks, but the colorful bricks are “girls only.”
“I always tell the boys, ‘You’re going to have a turn’ — and I’m like, ‘Yeah, when hell freezes over’ in my head,” she said. “I tell them, ‘You’ll have a turn’ because I don’t want them to feel bad.”
Although her approach might anger some parents, Keller is sticking to her guns: It’s all part of a plan to get girls building during “free choice,” the 40 minutes of unstructured play time embedded at the end of every school day.

Funny thing is, when left to choose toys of their own, the male children always went for the Lego bricks, while the females opted for baby dolls and crayons. She didn’t like that, so she decided to take that choice away from them and choose toys for them instead.

For years, Keller, who has taught at Captain Johnston Blakely Elementary since 2008, watched with discouragement as self-segregation defined her classroom — her boy students flocked to the building blocks while her girl students played with dolls and crayons and staples, toys that offered them little challenge or opportunity to fail and develop perseverance.
She did her research and concluded that something had to give; her girl students were indeed missing out.

Now here’s the real evil part: she only started making this choice for the kids after she did some research and found out that playing with Lego was supposedly helping with the boys’ cognitive development.

Lego play, Keller found, has been widely attributed to accelerating development and helping children fine-tune spatial and math skills, two of the largest areas of cognitive disparity between men and women.
Further, female STEM role models are few and far between, and part of the reason for their underrepresentation, Keller believes, are the gender stereotypes women are socialized into from an early age.
She faults toymakers for reinforcing those roles — “the stuff LEGO is marketing for girls is just so limiting;” ‘girl’ sets replete with themes such as baking, cooking, care-giving, homemaking, decorating and hair styling — but she also faults teachers for not taking action.
“I just feel like we are still so far behind in promoting gender equity,” Keller explained.
Which is what led Keller to her classroom experiment.
If girls were given the opportunity, would they develop different play preferences? She thought so, and she could cite a study or two to back the claim up.

Why? Because equality!

Lego play, Keller found, has been widely attributed to accelerating development and helping children fine-tune spatial and math skills, two of the largest areas of cognitive disparity between men and women.
Further, female STEM role models are few and far between, and part of the reason for their underrepresentation, Keller believes, are the gender stereotypes women are socialized into from an early age.
She faults toymakers for reinforcing those roles — “the stuff LEGO is marketing for girls is just so limiting;” ‘girl’ sets replete with themes such as baking, cooking, care-giving, homemaking, decorating and hair styling — but she also faults teachers for not taking action.
“I just feel like we are still so far behind in promoting gender equity,” Keller explained.
Which is what led Keller to her classroom experiment.
If girls were given the opportunity, would they develop different play preferences? She thought so, and she could cite a study or two to back the claim up.

Home-schooling has never sounded like a better idea.

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