Here’s how actual Japanese people are reacting to “Yellow face”

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Vogue magazine recently came under fire from Social Justice Warriors for promoting “yellow face”. The magazine recently released it’s “diversity magazine” issue which was intended to celebrate diversity and beauty, but ended up receiving criticism for choosing Caucasian model Karlie Kloss for a Japanese-themed photo shoot titled “Spirited Away.” Here is how Vogue explained the photo shoot in the magazine:

“Nestled among the sacred shrines of Japan’s Ise-Shima National Park, a tranquil geothermal spa resort taps into the country’s time-honored bathing rituals. Paying homage to Japan’s geisha culture, Karlie Kloss soaks up the serenity”.

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The backlash from Social Justice warriors was so much that Karlie Kloss had to apologize on Twitter.

She said she was sorry for participating in a photo-shoot that appropriated someone else’s culture. She also apologized for being “culturally insensitive” and promised to do better in the future.

These images appropriated a culture that is not my own and I am truly sorry for participating in a shoot that was not culturally sensitive. My goal is, and always will be, to empower and inspire women. I will ensure my future shoots and projects reflect that mission.
Sincerely, Karlie.

What would cause someone to apologize for doing a photo shoot, you ask?

Well see for yourself:

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However, it seems like Social Justice Warriors in western countries are the only ones taking offense to the photo-shoot.

Back home in Japan, the photo-shoot was praised by Japanese people who didn’t find it offensive in the slightest. In fact, most of them criticized Social Justice Warriors for trying to take offense on their behalf.

Here are just some of the reactions, translated from Japanese into English, thanks to Goboiano.

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TRANSLATION:

Karlie Kloss dresses like a Japanese person.
Japanese people: Wow! You respect Japanese culture! You’re our friend! We’re happy!
People overseas: She’s stealing Japanese culture!
People overseas: She’s making fun of Japanese people!
Japanese people: Huh?

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TRANSLATION:

What makes me angry is people getting upset and shouting that this is racist even as they ignore the sensibilities of people in Japan. It’s easy to see that they’re trying to use the situation to drum up business, and in the end, they don’t really care about what the people from the culture in question actually think.
They’re psychopaths who get a sense of superiority by calling anything and everything racist until the other party bows its head in shame.

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TRANSLATION:

So foreigners see this and think it’s racist. But Japanese me sees this and has no idea what they’re talking about. These photos are cool.
Karlie Koss and Vogue magazine seem to have issued an apology. They may have big bodies, but foreigners sure are narrow-mindedly hung up on small things.

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TRANSLATION:

So the overseas reaction was “Mighty Whitey cosplays as inferior Jap race, is called racist, and apologizes.” Political correctness is getting weird. The ones calling her racist have more racist ideas. And in the picture with the sumo wrestler, isn’t she cosplaying as Sazae-san?

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TRANSLATION:

I think this is Asian-style cosplay art, coming from the image people from North America and Europe, as opposed to Japanese, have. If this is racist, then we can’t do cosplay, right? I don’t think there’s any malicious or slanderous intent, and the only thing I can see it as is an art piece. I don’t think Karlie Koss has anything to apologize for.

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TRANSLATION:

So after Karlie Koss, is this the next American girl they’re going to start hounding for an apology?  

Turns out that the only people who offended by “cultural appropriation” are special snowflakes westerners.